How to Flush DNS Cache


Flushing your DNS cache can be useful when the information about a domain you hold is outdated, usually due to a recent change that has been made. While this step forces the DNS data out of your system, if the DNS server used for the queries does not have the updated information, you will still get the outdated data. Keep in mind that you will need to restart your browser after completing the following steps.

Windows 98/NT/2000/XP Flush DNS

Flushing the DNS on Windows is an easy process, outlined below is the steps that should be run if you wish to clear your DNS cache.

  1. Open up a command prompt (Start > Run > cmd.exe > OK).
  2. Type in the command ipconfig /flushdns

Windows Vista / Windows 7 Flush DNS

Flushing DNS on newer versions of Windows is almost as easy as the earlier versions but due to Microsoft's security additions you must run the command prompt with administrator privileges.

  1. Click the start button and navigate to the command prompt (Start > All Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt)
  2. Make sure that you right click on the command prompt application and choose "Run as Administrator"
  3. Type in the command ipconfig /flushdns

Windows 8 / Windows 8.1 Flush DNS

Flushing the DNS cache on Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 is a very easy process. Due to system security permissions, you must ensure that you run the command prompt as an administrator user.

  1. Ensure that you're on the Windows 8 Start Screen.
  2. Simply type cmd and the Windows search bar will appear on the right hand side with search results.
  3. Right click on Command Prompt and click Run as administrator.
  4. Type in the command ipconfig /flushdns

Mac OS X Flush DNS

Flushing the DNS in Mac OS X is an easy process, but the steps taken will depend on which version of OS X you are running.

Mountain Lion or Lion

If you are running Mac OS X 10.7 or 10.8, you need to do the following:

  1. Open up the command terminal.
  2. Run the command sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

OSX Leopard

If you are running Mac OS X 10.6, you need to do the following:

  1. Open up a command terminal.
  2. Run the command dscacheutil -flushcache

Leopard and below

If you are running Mac OS X 10.5.1 or below, you need to do the following:

  1. Open a command terminal.
  2. Run the command lookupd -flushcache

Linux Flush DNS

If you are running the nscd Name Service Cache Daemon then you will need to do the following.

  1. Open up a command terminal (either as root or run step 2 with sudo)
  2. Run the command /etc/init.d/nscd restart

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